Clinical Studies

There are two main types of clinical studies: clinical trials and observational studies.  In a clinical trial, there is some form of treatment intervention. There is no intervention in an observational study, which is aimed at observing patients to better understand the long-term course of their disease.

Clinical trials are used to test new treatments before they are approved for use by the FDA. This type of trial gives patients a chance to try out a new medication in its early stages. As with any experiment, the result of a trial is not known before its conclusion. Your participation could help demonstrate a terrific treatment breakthrough, or it could help scientists discover that a new treatment does not work after all. There may be some risk involved from the treatment in a clinical trial.

Participating in either a clinical trial or an observational study is a serious responsibility. Volunteering to participate could be a way to help yourself, affected family members and other patients by advancing medical and scientific knowledge of your condition. Some patients derive great satisfaction from assisting doctors in the study of their disease. Participation in a study can also mean a chance to meet a porphyria researcher in a clinical setting, and the consultation can be beneficial.

For information on porphyria trials currently recruiting patients, call the APF office or visit NIH’s clinical trials website: “Clinical Trials of Medical Treatments: Why Volunteer?” might also be useful reading as you think about whether you’d like to participate or not.